Paul Reichlin at Cedardale Upholstery in Mt. Vernon modified the original seat and trimmed it and the interior panels in tobacco-colored leather pleats. Roger Domini, prior owner of Jack Calori’s hallmark ’36 coupe, filled the dash. If Swanson’s 12-port fetish has a rival, it’s Stewart-Warner gauges like the ones in the ’32 Auburn panel he fit to that dash.

Dave Secrist cut all new windows and John Byers (Byers Custom and Restoration in Auburn) wood-grained the garnish moldings around them and the insert at the top of the dash. Geoff Skene gave Swanson the ’37 Lincoln Zephyr steering wheel. Don Meth at Show Quality Metal Finishing in Seattle plated everything bright, including the Deuce mast jacket under that wheel.

Double Down Or Split?

To be honest neither words nor pictures do the differences justice. Gilligan’s car has an earthy, organic feeling a hot rod can acquire only by evolving over decades; Swanson’s looks and feels simply exquisite. On paper the two are practically the same but in the flesh the two could hardly be any different and still resemble five-window Ford coupes.

That’s refreshing if you think of it. How many ideas have been explored since the birth of the hot rod? You’d think by now we would’ve exhausted them. Ironic, isn’t it, that a pair of red, Chevy-powered Deuces could make the case we haven’t done it all yet.

Rod & Custom Feature Car

Steve Gilligan

Washington State

1932 Ford Five-Window Coupe

Pat Swanson

Washington State

1932 Ford Five-Window Coupe