Norris Creagh
Macomb County, Michigan
1935 Ford Pickup

Karen Black wrote to tell us about her dad, Norris, and his 1934 pickup. "In 1959 my dad was a 17-year-old entrepreneur. He decided he wanted is own landscape business but had no means to move his lawn mower around. He located a 1935 Ford pickup in Rochester, Michigan, for $175 and never looked back.

"Year in, year out, the truck got the job done, with Dad slowly replacing worn-out parts. In 1964 Dad married his childhood sweetheart and brought her home in that same truck. Business was good and he continued restoring the pickup, placing Third in his first car show in 1966. When children came along the old Ford was pushed into the background, and used by one son and three daughters for climbing on, but though other vehicles were bought and sold, the Ford stayed.

"Fast forward to the 1990s and my brother and sisters are all wrenching on their own vehicles. I would spend hours hanging out in the garage with my dad, who decided that it was time to give the Ford a little TLC. He started a frame-off restoration and changed it up a bit. In 2002 he entered it in the Detroit Autorama and took First Place in its class.

"When I look at words that people use to describe the word 'DAD' I see 'Dreamer And Determined'. This describes my father. A lot of people dream, but he made his come true. That 1935 Ford is still a central part of our lives. I love the days Dad would get into his truck, Mom in her 1940 Ford, and me in my Nova, and we would head for a car show. Dad, I will cherish those memories forever. Thanks for sharing your love of cars and trucks, and for all the father/daughter time."


Paul Filipowicz
Jefferson, Wisconsin
Ford F-1 and 1935 Chevy Pickup

Paul Filipowicz wrote to us recently asking why we hadn't featured any Flathead-powered rides of late. To help redress the balance he followed up with pictures of his F-1, running a rebuilt 239 with twin 94s. He says he drives it daily now he's put new King Pins in, adding, "I've had many 1940-56 Ford trucks over the years and never did the King Pins. I can't stop laughing about the difference, actually."

He also sent a pic of his first truck, a 1935 Chevy. He and his father had just replaced the wood around the doors. "At the time I had a 283 that was bored to 301 that was gonna go in it but the whole lot was left behind when we relocated from Illinois to Wisconsin. I can't believe I still had this pic. That's the way it goes. Looking forward to seeing some more L-motors."


Karen & George Toscano Jr.
Hampton, New Hampshire
1941 Plymouth

This 1941 Plymouth is George and Karen Toscano's "Richard Petty" tribute rod. Having owned the car for 23 years, George has driven it on two Hot Rod Power Tours, in 2011 and 2013.

These days the sedan has a tubular Mustang II front suspension and a Ford 9-inch rearend, hung on an adjustable four-link, coilover shocks at all four corners, and 1 3/8-inch splined sway bars, front and back.

George admits he may annoy the Mopar purists by stating that the power comes from a 429 Ford big-block bored 0.030 over. An Eagle 502 forged stroker crank has been added with "H" rods. According to his math, it now displaces 520 ci. On the dyno, it has 1 hp/ci and 620 lb-ft of torque at the crank with 9.5 compression. The power is delivered via a Tremec five-speed.

The owners recently took the Plymouth to the Richie McFarland Children's Center (RMCC) "Touch a Truck" fundraiser. The RMCC is a charity that works with 3- to 6-year-olds with learning disabilities and specializes in early intervention. George says, "To all you guys who think your cars are tough, how about 600 to 800 kids, 3 to 6 years old, crawling through the front seats of your car, up to six at a time, performing the "rip the turn signal selector out of the steering column" torture test? Touching your car with sticky fingers from candy or ice cream? One of the best shows I've ever been to."


Mail vintage photos of you and your hot rod, along with detailed info to: Rod & Custom Magazine, Attn: Kev Elliott/Yesterday's Young Guns, 1733 Alton Pkwy., Ste. 100, Irvine, CA 92606. Send recent photos of your current ride to Kev Elliott/Readers' Rods at the same address. Send digital images (500 KB or larger) to kevin.elliott@sorc.com. We cannot return submitted material and please include your phone number.