Off the rack and sitting on its wheels with the ShockWaves fully deflated, it's obvious the car sits slightly nose-high, though the dropped spindles will rectify this. Apart from a psychological boost, there's a reason for this step. I wanted to ensure nothing could touch the ground at full drop, and also check that none of the suspension parts hit the body either. In the event of catastrophic failure I want to be able to steer the car to the side of the road, not be sliding along the blacktop with sparks flying. The rearend differential yoke does hit the driveshaft tunnel, so that will need rectifying despite me having raised the tunnel once already. However, this was a closed driveline car previously, and I wasn't too concerned if the torque tube kissed the tunnel every once in a while. In all seriousness, low cars look cool, but safety has to be considered foremost. Ask me sometime of my personal experiences of a modified car I bought whose builder ignored scrublines and why I like to fit front driveshaft loops!

SOURCE
Classic Performance Products
378 E Orangethorpe Ave.
Placentia
CA  92870
800-830-1724
http://www.classicperform.com
Chassis Engineering
West Branch
IA
319-643-2645
http://www.chassisengineeringinc
.com
RideTech
350 S. St. Charles Street
Jasper
IN  47546
812-481-4787
http://www.ridetech.com
Dynamat
3042 Symmes Road
Hamilton
OH  45015
513-860-5094
http://www.dynamat.com